Halloween limericks – How to write limerick poetry for kids

[Day 12]

Halloween pumpkin

Halloween pumpkin

Today you can read and listen to one of my Halloween limericks. I will post a couple of limericks the next days. What is limerick poetry? A limerick is a five line poem with a strict form (AABBA), which intends to be witty or humorous! Limericks have been around since the 18th century. Read some examples of limerick poetry in my post which explains how to write limericks. St. Patrick’s Day is often associated with limerick poetry popularized in English by Edward Lear (1812 – 1888). Limerick Day is celebrated on his birthday, May 12. You can download a free E-book of Edward Lear – find a download link and resources at the end of this posting.

Labels: Halloween limericks, Halloween rhymes and verses, limericks for kids, learn how to write limericks, create your own limericks, read samples of limerick poetry, limerick resources

The Terrible Ghost by Milouflyingwitch

There once was a terrible ghost
Who was much scarier than most
He howled and screamed
His body beamed
But the thing he did best was boast


Limericks Edward Lear

Limericks Edward Lear

A Limerick is a five line poem that follows a specific rhyming pattern and rhythm (AABBA). Limericks are often “funny” and easy to write for children. Limericks, otherwise known as poetry for the common man are filled with humor and rhyming and can have a darker sense of humor. If you want to read more limericks check out the free E-book: The Project Gutenberg E-book of Book of Nonsense, by Edward Lear and physics limericks.

Writing a limerick? Learn how to write a Limerick? Limerick rules and guidelines.

  • A limerick is a five-line poem written with one triplet and one couplet.
  • The triplet is a three-line rhymed poem and the couplet is a two-line rhymed poem
  • The rhyme pattern is AABBA with lines 1, 2 and 5 containing 3 beats(accents) and rhyming
  • Lines 1, 2 and 5 each consist of 7 to 10 syllables and rhyme
  • Lines 3 and 4 having two beats(accents) of rhyming
  • Lines 3 and 4 have 5 to 7 syllables each and rhyme with each other
  • Important for a “good” limerick is the last line; where the punch line or heart of the joke lies🙂

It is possible to construct a limerick with non matching A or B lines; but it is essential that the overall beat structure remains and that the flow of words allows the lines to be spoken as if they were identical.

Her are some resources about how to write limericks
Teacher’s lesson plan: preparing for poetry limerick lesson
Poet Bruce Lansky: How to write a limerick: Giggle Poetry
Limerick structure, limericks rules and guidelines: Link

Example by Edward Lear, BOOK OF NONSENSE

There was an Old Man of the Nile,
Who sharpened his nails with a file;
Till he cut off his thumbs,
And said calmly, “This comes–
Of sharpening one’s nails with a file!”

Template A
There once was a ______________ from __________________.
All the while he hoped _______________________________.
So he _______________________________.
And _________________________________.
That ___________________ from ___________________.

Example by Edward Lear

There was a Young Lady of Russia,
Who screamed so that no one could hush her;
Her screams were extreme,
No one heard such a scream,
As was screamed by that Lady of Russia.

Template B
I once met a _________________ from ___________________.
Every day she _______________________________________.
But whenever she ______________________.
The _________________________________.
That strange ___________________ from __________

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